Curriculum

Oe Masamichi reorganised the curriculum when he became the 17th generation headmaster. It was Oe Sensei that classified the curriculum as we know it today.

Seiza no Bu

The forms at this level were derived from Omori-ryu Iaido.Omori-ryu was added to the curriculum by Hayashi Rokudayu Morimasa (1661 - 1732), the 9th headmaster of the Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu. Omori took several partner exercises (Katachi) of Kenjutsu and Iai/Battojutsu, and combined them with the movements of formal tea ceremony etiquette (Ogasawara Ryu Seiza Reiho) to create a series of techniques initiated from the formal seiza kneeling position. Omori's objective was to create a curriculum that allowed the Iaidoka to practice techniques suited for the posture in which they most often found theselves sitting during the peace of the Edo period.

Iai was traditionally practiced either from a standing position or from a seated posture called Tatehiza (standing knee) designed for relaxing while fully armored. Since the Edo period called for little posing in armor, the techniques of Omori Rokurozaemon were more practical, and since the movements of these exercises were very basic, the seiza waza became the set taught first to beginners. These waza became part of the curriculum of the Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu when the 9th grandmaster, Hayashi Rokudayu, studied under Omori. He incorporated the seiza waza into Eishin Ryu, calling them Omori Ryu in honor of their creator.

Seiza no Bu contains the following techniques:

  1. Mae (Forward)
  2. Migi (Right)
  3. Hidari (Left)
  4. Ushiro (Rear)
  5. Yaegaki (8-Fold Fences, Fences within Fences)
  6. Ukenagashi (Block and Flow)
  7. Kaishaku (Assist Seppuku)
  8. Tsukekomi (Pursuit)
  9. Tsukikage (Moon Shadow, Moon Beams)
  10. Oikaze (Tailwind)
  11. Nukiuchi (Sudden Draw)

Tatehiza no Bu

The forms at this level were derived from Hasegawa Eishin-ryu Iaido. Originally created in the 17th century by Hasegawa Chikaranosuke Eishin (Hidenobu), who was the 7th undisputed headmaster of the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu. Tatehiza waza are performed starting from tatehiza, a half-seated position.

Tatehiza no bu contains the following techniques:

  1. Yokogumo (cloud bank)
  2. Toraissoku (tiger's step)
  3. Inazuma (lightning)
  4. Ukigumo (floating cloud)
  5. Oroshi (wind down from the mountain)
  6. Iwanami (wave hitting rocks)
  7. Urokogaeshi (dragon turn)
  8. Namigaeshi (wave returns)
  9. Takiotoshi (waterfall)
  10. Makko (draw/cut)

Tachiwaza

These waza sets are intended for advanced practitioners. Tachiwaza is included in the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu at the advanced level. These waza are performed from a standing position with the oku walk with the exception of Itamagoi 1-3 which start from seiza.

Tachiwaza no bu contains the following techniques:

  1. Yukizure (Accompaniment)
  2. Tsuredachi (Companions)
  3. So Makuri (Complete Resolution)
  4. So Dome (Full Stop)
  5. Shinobu (Loyal Retainer)
  6. Yukichigai (Misdirection)
  7. Sodezuri Gaeshi (Sleeve Turns)
  8. Mon'iri (Entering Through the Gate)
  9. Kabezoe (By the Wall)
  10. Ukenagashi (Block and flow)
  11. Itomagoi 1 (Farewell 1)
  12. Itomagoi 2 (Farewell 2)
  13. Itomagoi 3 (Farewell 3)

Iwaza

Iwaza is included in the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu at the advanced level. These waza are performed starting in the tatehiza position.

Iwaza no bu contains the following techniques:

  1. Kasumi (Mist)
  2. Sunegakoi (Knee Covering)
  3. Tozume (Blocked at the Door)
  4. Towaki (Beneath the Doorway)
  5. Shihogiri (Attacking the Four Sides)
  6. Tanashita (Beneath the Shelf)
  7. Ryozume (Blocked on Both sides)
  8. Torabashiri (Tiger Run)

Bangai

Bangai (extended Tachiwaza) included in the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu at the advanced level. These waza are performed starting from a standing position. They were created by Oe Masamichi and are sometimes used by the student that does not have much practice time available because they contain many elements.

  1. Hayanami (Fast Wave)
  2. Raiden (Thunder and Lightning)
  3. Jinrai (Thunderclap)

Paired Waza (Kumitachi)

The kata of the school are practiced with bokken (or bokto) and are pre-arranged sequences between two participants referred to as shidachi and uchidachi.

Tachiuchi no Kurai is the first of the two man kata sets (kumitachi). There are two versions of this kata, the 10 waza set is the original set, the 7 waza set is a revised version developed by the 17th headmaster, Oe Masamichi (sometimes referred to as Tachi Uchi no Kata). Many, although not all, of the techniques are similar between these related sets.

Typically the 7 waza set is most often seen. It comprises the following kata:

  1. Deai
  2. Kobushitori
  3. Zetsumyoken
  4. Dokumyoken
  5. Tsubadome
  6. Ukinagshi
  7. Mappo

Tsumeai no Kurai is the second of the kumitachi waza sets, performed from tatehiza and standing positions. Practiced by advanced iai students only, Tsumeai no kurai (and other advanced kumitachi) is sometimes assumed, by beginners and outsiders, to be no longer practiced because it is rarely seen. It comprises the following kata:

  1. Hassou
  2. Kobushidori
  3. Iwanami
  4. Yaegaki
  5. Urokogaeshi
  6. Kurai Yurumi
  7. Tsubame Gaeshi
  8. Gan Seki Otoshi
  9. Sui Getsu Tou
  10. Kasumi Ken
  11. Uchi Komi

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